Products
Services & Info

Conifers

Abies bornmuelleriana
Beautiful dark green, glossy needles on stiff stems. The tree is slow during the establishment period but grows up to 18 inches a year after its roots are deeply set. It grows in a wide range of conditions, tolerating moisture as well as dry soils. An excellent Christmas tree species.
Abies grandis - Grand Fir
Abies grandis - Grand Fir

These statuesque trees thrive in open, sunny areas with good drainage, and can be used as a choice ornamental specimen in parks. The needles, when handled or rustled, exude an enlivening citrus-like scent, which has helped Grand fir become a favorite, especially for Christmas Trees!

Abies nordmanniana - Nordman Fir
Abies nordmanniana - Nordman Fir

Dark green, gracefully symmetrical, and vigorous in cultivation, the Nordmann Fir is a great substitute for those alpine natives that don't want to grow in hot valleys! The Nordmann Fir makes a good Christmas tree, sturdy enough to hold ornaments but open enough to display them. 

Calocedrus decurrens - Incense Cedar
Calocedrus decurrens - Incense Cedar

This is the most beautiful of all trees, in my opinion, with their rich red-brown bark in long soft fibers, and bright yellowish-green foliage changing to purple-green in the cold of winter. These majestic trees are fertile, fast-growing, stately and very long-lasting. Then, of course, there's their earthy elemental scent. I plant thousands of them and love every one.

Carbon Sequestration Credit
Carbon Sequestration Credit

Want to contribute to the sequestration of carbon? Purchase one (or many more!) of our carbon sequestration credits to provide your support! Every time you purchase a credit, 99 cents is donated towards the planting of a tree in any one of our multiple local riparian restoration jobs.

 

 

Cedrus deodara - Deodar Cedar
Cedrus deodara - Deodar Cedar

The Deodar Cedar has a nodding tip, a soft, light texture, and accepts pruning to thicken and control spread. Its showy, light-brown cones mature in the fall. This tree is beautiful in a large yard.

Cedrus deodara 'Emerald Falls' - Weeping Himalayan Cedar
Cedrus deodara 'Emerald Falls' - Weeping Himalayan Cedar

This amazing weeping Himalayan Cedar is an excellent choice specimen plant and is sure to catch the eye of all who pass by!

Cedrus libani - Cedar of Lebanon
Cedrus libani - Cedar of Lebanon

This is a slow-growing, majestic tree with a massive trunk and wide-spreading crown, on branches spreading horizontally in tiers at maturity. When young, it is more dense and pyramidal. 

Cedrus libani Glauca Pendula - Blue Weeping Cedar of Lebanon
Cedrus libani Glauca Pendula - Blue Weeping Cedar of Lebanon

This is definitely an "accent specimen," a conifer useful in a full-sun or lightly shaded area where you want to make a statement. The Blue Weeping Cedar of Lebanon has pendulous, irregular-growing branches clothed in powdery bluish-green needle clumps. 

Chamaecyparis lawsoniana - Port Orford Cedar
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana - Port Orford Cedar

This beautiful lacy native of our coastal areas is a choice landscape tree. Densely pyramidal with soft, graceful, blue-green foliage, it can be placed where it will be admired as a specimen, or it can be planted closely for a graceful, decorative screen or hedge.

Compost
Compost

Our Compost grows outrageous plants, be it vegetables in containers, raised beds or in the ground, Trees, or any planting needs! You will not be dissappointed. Bulk quantities, available for local pickup, or delivery with 10 yard minimum.

Cryptomeria japonica 'Black Dragon' - Black Dragon Japanese Cedar
Cryptomeria japonica 'Black Dragon' - Black Dragon Japanese Cedar

This unique species of Cryptomeria is one of our funkiest- it's sharp texture, stiff black-green needles, and interestingly pyramidal form make is an excellent specimen plant for any garden. 

Hesperocyparis arizonica - Arizona Cypress
Hesperocyparis arizonica - Arizona Cypress

This stately tree, native to the southwestern U.S., is an exceptional choice for non-irrigated landscapes. Use as a majestic specimen, windbreak, or Christmas Tree!

Hesperocyparis bakeri ssp. Matthewsii - Baker Cypress
Hesperocyparis bakeri ssp. Matthewsii - Baker Cypress

If we had to choose one tree to represent Plant Oregon, I'm sure it would be the Siskiyou Cypress. It is a beautiful, desirable plant. It speaks to us of our need to protect and preserve our environment. Beautiful foliage, graceful shape, and shiny, round cones contribute to its landscape value, as well. 

Larix occidentalis - Western Larch, Tamarack
Larix occidentalis - Western Larch, Tamarack

Discovered by Lewis and Clark in 1806, this native is still somewhat rare in the nursery industry. The grass-green needles turn a bright gold in autumn before dropping to reveal the branch structure and cones. This is a good additon to a mixed conifer planting, providing seasonal interest.

Metasequoia glyptostroboides - Dawn Redwood
Metasequoia glyptostroboides - Dawn Redwood

'From the dawn of time'- that's what the name 'Dawn Redwood' refers to. Fossils of this genus have confirmed that it's been growing for a hundred million years or more!! Dawns are beautiful landscape choices, with feathery and light foliage, buttressed trunks, and rapid growth. All but the smallest yards should include Dawn Redwoods.

Picea abies 'Acrocona' - Red Cone Norway Spruce
Picea abies 'Acrocona' - Red Cone Norway Spruce

Showy, robust, butter-scotch cones add year-round beauty to this pyramidal evergreen spruce with short, luscious dark green needles. The cones emerge an upright, vibrant dark red, only accentuating this plants enjoyable presence in the landscape. 

 

Picea abies 'Nidiformis' - Bird's Nest Spruce
Picea abies 'Nidiformis' - Bird's Nest Spruce

Well-loved conifer with a classic shape, the Bird's Nest is endearing. It can be used in many situations with great charm. Its dense foliage provides good shelter for birds.

Picea englemannii - Englemann Spruce
Picea englemannii - Englemann Spruce

This is a less commonly grown species than its cousin, the Sitka Spruce; it is also less prickly. The Englemann Spruce may be the tree you've been seeking for that cold, damp, shady corner. Not as dark, or drear some would say, as the Norway Spruce, it is an easier size to use -- another native useful in the cultivated landscape.

Picea pungens - Colorado Spruce
Picea pungens - Colorado Spruce

What would our suburban landscapes be, without Colorado Spruce? Classic conical form and regular habit endear the Colorado. Often referred to as the Blue Spruce, the Colorado comes in many shades of blue and green. Most trees have bluer new growth which turns greener as the needles age.

Pinus aristata - Bristlecone Pine
Pinus aristata - Bristlecone Pine

Even as very young, foot-high specemens, these have a 'mature' look. Dense, dark needles are lightened with the white resin glands characteristic of the species. This is a plant to cherish, and to pass down to future generations. 

Pinus jeffreyi - Jeffrey Pine
Pinus jeffreyi - Jeffrey Pine

A large, lovely native, I prefer this to Ponderosa (but not by much). Its long needles in bundles of three are a blued green and sometimes twisted. Handsome bark, deeply fissured on older trees, and stately form lend dignity to its presence.

Pinus leucodermis - Bosnian Pine
Pinus leucodermis - Bosnian Pine

While an old tree may reach fifty feet in its native Balkan/Mediterranean region, the Bosnian is so slow that it is not apt to be more than twenty-five feet after a good many years in cultivation. Gray-white bark is in contrast to the heavy, dark, stiff needles. Beautiful used in a rock garden, it deserves wide use.

Pinus monophylla - Single-leaf Pinyon Pine
Pinus monophylla - Single-leaf Pinyon Pine

This slow growing, rustic, native single-leaf pine is cherished for its nutritious crop of delicious edible nuts. Attracts wildlife and drought tolerant, perfect for native species and wildlife gardens, or for use as a live Christmas tree! 

 

Pinus mugo v. pumilio - Dwarf Mugo Pine
Pinus mugo v. pumilio - Dwarf Mugo Pine

This Dwarf Mugo Pine hails from the high mountains of Europe, but makes a delightful addition to gardens here in the states. Dark green needles proudly adorn stiff, upright branches that grow into a rounded shrub that makes an excellent foundation or mass planting, border, or rock garden specimen.

Pinus nigra 'Oregon Green' - Oregon Green Austrian Pine
Pinus nigra 'Oregon Green' - Oregon Green Austrian Pine

The deep, rich green needles and stiff, upright branches with tall, whiteish candle-like new growth in the spring make this cultivar of the European Black Pine a striking specimen. Unique shape adds a bit of Japanese Garden flavor!

 

Pinus ponderosa - Ponderosa Pine
Pinus ponderosa - Ponderosa Pine

The most common native pine in Southern Oregon, the Ponderosa is a beautiful landscape choice where there is room for its great height. its open conical form in youth becomes a tall spire with age. Best for large areas, it loves the hot, dry slopes of its native range. 

Pinus thunbergii 'Thunderhead' - Thunderhead Japanese Black Pine
Pinus thunbergii 'Thunderhead' - Thunderhead Japanese Black Pine

The ten year old Thunderhead we have in our landscape elicits more requests for purchase than any other pine we grow. Quite dramatic, especially when its large candles contrast with its deep green, dense foliage, it really deserves a specimen site.

Pseudotsuga menziesii - Douglas Fir
Pseudotsuga menziesii - Douglas Fir

Beloved native of the Pacific Northwest, this is a great landscape plant where there is room for its mature size. It is essential in a mixed conifer planting, a grand specimen where its scale is appropriate. Douglas Firs are easily identified by their cones, with their distinctive three-part bracts.

Sequoia sempervirens - Coast Redwood
Sequoia sempervirens - Coast Redwood

The Coastal Redwoods are the world's tallest trees, and a walk through a redwood forest is awe-inspiring. They are appropriate for use in the landscape, and will thrive with lawn watering. Even in cultivation it is a large tree, but can be judiciously pruned or limbed up without destroying its beauty. 

Sequoiadendron giganteum - Sierra Redwood, Big Tree
Sequoiadendron giganteum - Sierra Redwood, Big Tree

With its distinct, pyramidal form and height, the Giant Redwood is identifiable from some distance. It grows rapidly as a young tree- we've had them stretch as much as six feet in one year, but don't regularly expect that! Three feet a year is more common. This is a wonderful tree to live with. 

Sequoiadendron giganteum 'Pendulum' - Weeping Giant Sequoia
Sequoiadendron giganteum 'Pendulum' - Weeping Giant Sequoia

These imperial, ghostly weeping conifers provide a stupendous display wherever they are planted. Graceful, tightly pendulous branches make a bold, rustic statement as they loom over whoever observes them. 

 

Thuja plicata - Western Red Cedar
Thuja plicata - Western Red Cedar

A magnificent specimen in a large area, Red Cedar can also be pruned and clipped for a graceful hedge. It adds a fine texture to a large conifer planting.

Thuja plicata var. Excelsa - Excelsa Western Red Cedar
Thuja plicata var. Excelsa - Excelsa Western Red Cedar

Thuja plicata 'Excelsa' is a garden version of the magnificent native Western Red Cedar. This smaller version makes an excellent screening plant with its rapid growth and elegant structure.

Thuja plicata var. Virescens - Western Red Cedar
Thuja plicata var. Virescens - Western Red Cedar

This is a very usable and lovely conifer. It is dense (more open when young), but not tight or constricted. Virescens maintains its good form without pruning or special attention. We like this and Watnong Green, and have a hard time telling them apart! Both have dark green, graceful foliage.

Thuja plicata var. Watnong Green - Watnong Green Cedar
Thuja plicata var. Watnong Green - Watnong Green Cedar

Use Watnong Green as a moderately-sized specimen to anchor a corner or as a screen or hedge of manageable proportions (with little or no pruning needed). Its rich color and density look good in a mixed conifer planting, too.

Thujopsis dolabrata Variegata - Variegated Elk Horn Cedar
Thujopsis dolabrata Variegata - Variegated Elk Horn Cedar

This is a very interesting specimen whose unique foliage commands attention in the landscape. Horn like scales hug tightly to the branchlets, providing a slightly chunky texture. Creamy white color splashes in the foliage add great accent to the landscape.

Tsuga heterophylla - Western Hemlock
Tsuga heterophylla - Western Hemlock

Considered one of the most beautiful of all conifers, use our native hemlock where a light, delicate texture and slender form is needed. Requiring at least dappled shade in hot summer areas and low elevations, plant it with other natives, like huckleberry, Englemann Spruce, Alpine Spirea, Mountain Hemlock, and Kinnikinnik, to create a cool, calm, woodland. 

Wood Chips
Wood Chips